A Delicious Butter Tofu, Red Lentil, and Spinach Rice Indian Lunch – Cooking, History, and Philosophy at Veda, Part II

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Let it be known that I have a mini foodie journal with pages inside to write down favourite meals, restaurants, and gastronomical experiences, as well as little pages that have thought-provoking food-related questions to jog those creative writing juices.  Let it also be known that I haven’t had the heart to write in it yet because the paper looks so crisp and clean and pretty and I’m scared my writing will ruin the aesthetic of it.  Instead, I’ve been jotting down messy, scrawly notes in my blue fashionista Muffymade notebook and at the moment it looks as though it went through the wringer.  Pages are coming out, there are rips and wrinkles; it’s a little beat up. 

Which means I may have to turn to my little foodie journal after all.  And for good reason because I can now easily fill out a spot on the “favourite meals” page, without a doubt.  I had one of the best meals of my life (Indian and otherwise) this past week at Veda in Yorkville and I am so amoured I want to eat here every week for the rest of my life.  It was – and is – that amazing. 

I’ve wanted to eat at Veda for the longest time.  With its bright orange restaurant front and it’s small, but welcoming and cozy-looking  interior, it was a place I knew I had to visit.  My lunch here turned out to be one of the most delicious, nicest learning experiences because as I mentioned yesterday, I got a glimpse of Indian cooking, culture, history, and philosophy at work right before my eyes and I can thank my boyfriend and Veda’s decor for that!  I learned that the Veda refers to the anthology of texts that are devoted to Indian history, philosophy, and knowledge.  Thus, the name Veda is incredibly significant to the way the restaurant integrates important historical moments in India’s food culture into their product and cooking philosophy, and, in their words, “knowledge of healthful living” (emphasis added).

One of the ways in which Veda incorporates authentic Indian food culture into their restaurant is their serving style and meal sets.  As a popular lunch and dinner option, Veda serves a Tiffin Thali meal set complete with a choice of rice, protein, and vegetable.  Now, I know that doesn’t sound out of the ordinary; getting in your healthy food groups is a good thing!  However, what makes this particular meal set significant in terms of Indian history and food culture is the way in which it is served. 

Tiffin Thali literally refers to the type of servingware it is served in and the style of meal placement.  I’ll start with the thali since there’s a story behind the tiffin which I’ll get into shortly.  Those of you who are familiar with Indian food culture will already know this, but a thali generally refers to either a round tray with different compartments that food is served on with a number of different dishes on it, or a specific type of meal set such as a vegetarian thali, a meat thali, and others.

The term “tiffin” didn’t resonate with me until after I came home though.  Then the lightbulb went off.  There was a reason why it sounded so familiar and I realized it was because I had seen it at the Leslieville farmers’ market when I bought my lentil samosas from Tiffinday Inc., the Indian vegan catering company in Toronto!  The tiffin thali meals are served on a roundish, oblong stainless steel tray with adorable little stainless steel bowls to hold the vegetables, and the protein and meat. 

The cute stainless steel bowls are Veda’s nod to India’s historical, cultural past with food because tiffins are “food containers in transit”, so to speak.  Tiffins were used as a mode of delivery, bridging the gap of food accessibility between urban and suburban areas in India.  Tiffins were, and are, containers that are often stainless steel to be clean, convenient, and environmentally-friendly used to deliver take-out in and food in a quick and efficient way.  Hence why Tiffinday, as an Indian catering company, has the appropriate name that it does.

I’ll talk about Veda’s other menu items in greater detail next time, but I really want to focus on my tiffin thali because it was so delicious and memorable.  During my first meal here, I had the tiffin thali meal ($6.86) with spinach basmati rice, red lentils, and – wait for this – BUTTER TOFU!  OH.MY.GOD.  You all know I love butter chicken.  But butter tofu?!  I have NEVER come across butter tofu before and I was in absolute conniptions because I love tofu and I was so happy that there was a vegetarian protein option as delicious as THIS!  I added a giant piece of naan for an extra $0.99 and practically rolled down the street after my meal.  The portions are fantastic and so filling and the prices are incredibly reasonable, especially compared to other Indian places in the city.

The spinach basmati rice was light and fluffy with pieces of cooked, wilted spinach and cumin seed in it, and the red lentils were so delicious because it was a mildly spicy cross between a daal and paste.  The red lentils were so nice and thick and it was the perfect consistency to dip naan in it (and speaking of which, the naan was soft and chewy and scrumptious) and to mix the rice in.  And the butter tofu?  Creamy and soft and savoury and all sorts of amazing.  The tofu, cut into cubed chunks, was perfect because it wasn’t rubbery or mushy, and the butter sauce was rich, smooth, and full of rich tomato flavour.  I could eat a whole plate of this without even batting an eye.  I loved the textures and consistencies of the food, from the airiness of the rice, to the crunch of the cumin seeds, to the thick chili-like red lentils, and silkiness of the butter sauce over the tofu.  The food is mildly spicy so you’ll definitely feel some heat, but not so much you’ll need to chug liquids down or mop your forehead.  It’s the type of spicy that’s yummy and clears up your sinuses at the same time, let’s put it that way. 

Along with the spinach basmati rice, Veda has a vegetable biryani yellow rice, and vegetables include vegetable curry (broccoli, cauliflower, peppers, carrots, etc.), chickpea curry, and spiced lentils.  Butter chicken, chicken curry, and beef madras round out the meat options, and vegetarian proteins include the saag paneer (spinach cheese) and butter tofu.  I love the menu choices at Veda and I’m so looking forward to rotating my way around the different items and trying the different meals!  This was a fabulous meal and one that’s going into the books. 

*****

Veda is located at 874 Yonge St. at Davenport Rd., just north of Yorkville Ave. in the Yorkville neighbourhood.  The restaurant is located on the west side of Yonge St. and is only several blocks north of the Yonge & Bloor intersection and subway.  Their hours from Monday-Friday are 11:30am-9pm, 12pm-9pm on Saturday, and 5pm-9pm on Sundays.  They are both dine-in and take-out.

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A Delicious Meal to Remember – Indian Cooking and Philosophy at Veda, Part I

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The best meals create the best stories and blog posts.  I recently had one of the most delicious Indian meals – wait, scratch that, make that one of the most delicious meals ever– at Veda on Yonge Street in Yorkville and I had to share these snippets with you first before I dove into all the amazing details.  I wanted to do a scrapbook layout of this meal so much but alas, I can’t develop photos and scrap at the speed of light, so my scrapbook layout is going to have to wait.  Which may not be a bad thing.  It’ll give me another excuse to come eat here (not that I need one, but justification for stuffing my face is always nice), that way I’ll have even more beautiful, yummy photos to work with!

There’s so much I want to flush out, but I want to gather my thoughts a bit first because this was a meal like no other.  Not only did I have a wonderfully tasty lunch that left me rolling down the street afterward, but the meal was also a learning experience because I was able to catch a small glimpse of the philosophy, history, culture, and vibrancy behind Indian cooking and cuisine.

I’ve been berating myself for not featuring more Indian food on the blog (the only blog post I have is the one for Amaya’s Bread Bar during this past year’s Winterlicious.  Foreshame!) and I finally told myself it was time to give the Indian section of the blog some love.  I’ve been to fantastic places thanks to some friends and my boyfriend, and have eaten many a meal since my days in university, but the perfectionist in me, as always, didn’t like the photos I took of previous meals (let it be known that several years ago I couldn’t take a decent food photo to save my life) and to be perfectly honest, I wanted to learn more before I started blogging more.  

Indian food wasn’t food I grew up eating and I didn’t want to start posting up a storm pretending like I knew everything there was to know when I so obviously didn’t.  My foray into Indian food didn’t even begin until I was a bright-eyed, bushy-tailed grad student.  I wanted my journey and growth on this blog to be as authentic and organic as possible and I’m so grateful that I’ve had these opportunities to eat and learn and to learn from others.  I feel like I’ve taken away nuggets of knowledge from friends over the years and I know they’ve taken away some from me as well (why yes, there are over five dialects of Chinese and just as many regional cuisines to go along with them) and even now, I’m still learning about food that I have grown up with.  I’m excited as ever to share this wonderful gem with you all and I guarantee that after I’m done, you are going to trip over yourself to eat here.